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Facts and Resources

Stats  |  Break Free Initiatives  |  Publications and Materials  |  Alliance Newsletters


Stats


Across the board, the greatest single predictor of tobacco use is low socioeconomic status (SES).

Income

  • The smoking prevalence is much higher among adults living below the poverty level (28.9%) than those living at or above the poverty level (18.3%).1

Education

  • Smoking prevalence increases with decreasing education:1


  • And those with a general education diploma (GED) have a smoking prevalence of 45.2%!1

Cigar and smokeless tobacco use

  • The highest prevalence of current cigar use and smokeless tobacco use is among persons with less than a high school education.2
  • In 2010, cigar use increased among persons below the poverty level.2

Secondhand smoke

  • A higher proportion of nonsmokers living at or below the poverty level are exposed to secondhand smoke.3

Employment status

  • Among uninsured working adults aged 18 or over, 28.6% smoke.4
  • Individuals working in the below occupations have higher than average smoking rates:4


1 CDC. Vital Signs: Current Cigarette Smoking Among Adults Aged  ≥ 18 Years --- United States, 2004-2010. MMWR 2011; 60(35):1207-1212.
2 National Interview Health Survey, United States, 2010
3 CDC. Vital Signs: Nonsmokers' Exposure to Secondhand Smoke --- United States, 1999-2008. MMWR 2010;  59(35):1141-1146.
4 CDC. Current Cigarette Smoking Prevalence Among Working Adults --- United States, 2004-2010. MMWR 2011; 60(38):1305-1309.





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